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How to make ...

Mary Pickford

By Harvey Johnson

Ingredients

45ml White Rum

45ml Pineapple Juice

15ml Maraschino Liqueur

5ml Grenadine

Times:

Prep: 2 Minutes

Make: 30 Seconds

Total: 2 Minutes and 30 Seconds

Calories:

240 calories

Allergens:

Contains sulphites

Servings:

Serves 1

Mary Pickford, a classic rum cocktail created during the 1920s US Prohibition Era, is known to be sweet but with a kick—not unlike like its namesake.

Ingredients

45ml White Rum

45ml Pineapple Juice

15ml Maraschino Liqueur

5ml Grenadine

Method

Chill a martini glass in the freezer or fill with ice.

Take your Boston glass or small tin and, using your jigger to measure, add the rum, grenadine, pineapple juice, and maraschino liqueur to the shaker.

Fill the shaker with cubed ice and seal with the Boston tin or lid, before shaking vigorously for 10-15 seconds, or until your tin is very cold.

Remove your glass from the freezer or empty it of ice if necessary.

Using your Hawthorne strainer and your fine strainer, double strain the cocktail into your chilled martini glass.

If you like, garnish with some Maraschino cherries skewered with a toothpick and placed so that it rests on the side of the glass.

Serve and enjoy!

History

The most popular origin story for this tropical favourite goes as follows: In early 1920s Cuba, the Mary Pickford cocktail was created and named for the pioneering star, who was working on a film in Havana at the time with husband Douglas Fairbanks (as was Charlie Chaplin, Fairbanks’ best friend). The bartender responsible, as happens with most classic drinks, is somewhat debated. In this case, it comes down to two local bartenders: Eddie Woelke and Fred Kaufman, though Kaufman tends to get the lion’s share of the credit.

While the Cuba story is a fun one, Vanity Fair reports that “a thorough review of Mary and Doug’s schedule reveals no trips to Cuba—and they never made a film there during their marriage.” This throws a wrench in the tale, but it doesn’t necessarily mean that the drink wasn’t made in Pickford’s honour.